www.bayawe.com Mindful Living with Coffee

Drop of flavours

BEFORE ALL ELSE: AFTERTASTE

What is “Aftertaste”?

After swallowing a mouthful of coffee, every one of its elements mingle together, forming what’s known as the aftertaste. Needless to say, the aftertaste is very important. In many cases, it’s what makes a particular blend so unique. Post-imbibement, sip complete, we’re set to ask the magic question. “What does this remind me of?”

And other questions always follow. “Just what notes are present here?” Acidic? Sour? Bitter? Sweet? Umami, perhaps? Or even salty. Often, it’s surprising.

The next consideration must concern the dominant flavour present. Is its balance true and does the aftertaste, too, change? 

The final questions relate to texture. How is the mouthfeel aftertaste? For how long does it last precisely?

Black coffee

So many things to ponder:

Acidity can be crisp and bright, or mellow and clean.

The sweetness can be pleasant . . . or overpowering.

Excessive bitterness will prove discomforting. It can create a slight scratchy feeling as you swallow. Subtlety is the key.

Coffee brewing

Can you adjust the aftertaste?

During brewing, you can adjust almost everything! That said, the aftertaste is particularly tricky. Often times, this is a matter of the roasting technique, but water and coffee bean quality are other factors.

The longest aftertastes are those of espresso drinks and those made with mocha pots. To improve the aftertaste of filter coffee, you can slightly over-extract the coffee, or use a lower ratio. But the best way, as I’ve discovered from my experiences, is to simply use higher temperatures for the coffee brewing. If you spring for this approach, however, be sure to grind your coffee beans less. Otherwise, the coffee can turn out poorly.

One way to achieve a very long, pleasant aftertaste is via the “Slow Drip” method. This involves brewing coffee for a longer period, but without adding much water. For this method, you need a lot passion and a little extra time. This can take ten minutes or more, depending on your coffee beans. The final product is syrupier and creamier, leaving a longer aftertaste on your palate and in your throat.

Cup of coffee and glass of water
Cup of coffee and glass of water

Other things to try . . .

Before enjoying coffee, you can drink or wash your mouth with softer water.

Coffee’s aftertaste can be enhanced by pairing the beverage with particular foods. For medium-dark beans, I recommend cheese . . . but that’s just one example.

Soul aftertaste = memory

If the coffee was good, it might create a memorable aftertaste that will not only leave some hints in the mouth, but also on your soul. You will remember it for a long time and it might motivate you to find a similar experience again.

In my soul I have a couple very nice aftertastes, which I remember until now. They motivate me to continue to discover new magical coffee drinks. Some of my coffee memories were created during the time when I started to be passionate about coffee.

1+
French Press

FRENCH PRESS COFFEE BREWING

French Press coffee brewing is one of the easiest preparation methods. Many people all around the world use this unique brewing device not only to prepare delightful coffee, but also tea.

However, compared to other filter preparation methods, the French Press brews coffee that could a less healthy option for some people. The reason for it is that its metal filter doesn’t filter out the cafestol. Cafestol is a substance that may cause the rise of the body’s LDL, bad cholesterol.

French Press
french Press

I recommend

to consider filtering the final French Press coffee drink one more time with a paper filter. Moreover, lighter roasted coffee beans tend to be healthier than darker roasts.

The French Press preparation

is a fully immersion brewing method. The final taste of the coffee is heavy, dense and the flavours are more complex. The flavours are balanced and don’t change much each time you take a sip. French Press coffee drinks usually don’t offer many flavour surprises. But, for the morning coffee, when you are still more sleepy, it might be the perfect option.

My way of making the French Press

French Press
Photo by Pratik Gupta from Pexels

An important decision to make it is amount coffee to be used.
How many tea spoons or grams of coffee you will use, will depend on the size of your French Press.
Usually I use the ratio 1:14 (coffee:water). For the 1:14 ratio I will use 14 grams of medium coarse grinded coffee and 200 grams of 90 ℃ hot water.
Steps:

  1. Pre-heat the French Press.
  2. Pour 30 grams of water into the French Press and add the coffee grinds
  3. Mix the coffee grinds with the water by swirling the French Press, just make a few circles
  4. Wait for 15 seconds – and smell the bloom
  5. Pour the rest of the water (up to 200 grams) into the French Press
  6. Wait for 3 more minutes (Wait even 1 minute longer, if you are using coffee beans grown at a lower altitude.)
  7. Press and pour all the amount into a mug.
  8. Gently swirl the coffee around in tiny circles in the mug and wait for three minutes.

Some people do the mistake of leaving the final coffee drink in the French Press, using it as a server, instead of using another mug or container. If the coffee stays with the grinds in the French Press, the extraction process will continue. As a result, the last sips of the coffee will be rather bitter and sour.

1+
IMG 20180416 092057

ESPRESSO TIME

Espresso

I noticed that many coffee-shops in Europe – including some famous ones – offer shots of ‘Espresso’ that are in fact ‘Ristretto’ shots. A Ristretto shot has approximately half of the size of an Espresso shot. These coffee-shops should correct their menu to avoid misunderstandings between the baristas and their customers. After all, who wants disappointed customers?

Continue reading ESPRESSO TIME

1+
Kalita wave dripper

FILTERING OUT POOR FILTER CHOICES

Use Cone (Hario V60) or Flat-Bottom Dripper (Kalita, Melitta, Brewista)!

Often times, it’s a difficult decision choosing the right filters for your dripper. Many people give the matter very little thought . . . but this can be a mistake. If you’d like to make an informed decision, read on, as I’ll share my top picks.

The Hario V60’s cone shape and singular, large hole make it easily recognizable. Its conical design results in a consistent stream of water running towards the hole, carrying coffee grinds, like sediment down a miniature waterfall. In my opinion, it’s easy to use, and the final taste is clear and bright.

Hario V60  dripper
Coffee brewing – Cone shape dripper

The main disadvantage is its dripper being quite thick, which can affect the bloom. Furthermore, if you don’t pour in the water correctly, you run the risk of washing away finer parts of grind and blocking the mechanism. By adjusting the water temperature and grinding level, these obstacles can be nonetheless surmounted.

The flat-bottom dripper is a common alternative that allows coffee to drip into the cup. These drippers can have one big or three small holes, and their shape isn’t as sharp as cone models. The bed is thinner but holds the same amount of coffee as their counterpart, which is handy at the bloom stage. Hot water will not remain in contact with the coffee grinds for as long as cona shape drippers either.

The bottom flat also named Kalita wave filter

Control over flavour is achieved by the speed at which one pours water, the temperature of that water, and the consistency of the grind. At the base of flat-bottom drippers, the coffee can stay in contact with water for a longer duration, which helps to release more sugar from the coffee grinds. In my experience, the resultant coffee is more complex. Moreover, you can use fine or coarse grinds to suit your needs.

In conclusion . . .

If you want to make fast but nice-tasting coffee with stronger sharpeners and a clear taste, go for cone-shaped drippers.

If you like experimenting with coffee—creating a novel cocktail of flavours—go for flat-bottom drippers. The final cup tends to be more complex, better balanced, and sweeter.

As for me? I created my own way. I designed an earthen dripper in the pottery studio. It uses flat-bottom filters, but the dripper doesn’t have a sharp shape and features a single hole at center. The best of both worlds as they say!  

Hario V60
Drops of coffee from Hario dripper, pour-over – Cone shape
0
22281196 10214813445756147 998187482 o

THE ART OF COFFEE DRINKING

There’s nothing quite like a fresh start

Coffee is not just a drink. It’s a wonderful sensational experience!
To fully appreciate the aromas and flavors of our coffee drinks, we should make it a habit to cleanse our mouths properly before taking the first sip.
What’s the best way to cleanse our palates?
There are many different ways. It all depends on us and our preferences.

Continue reading THE ART OF COFFEE DRINKING

0
DSCF9956

DOES DAYLY LIGHT AFFECT FRESHINESS OF COFFEE BEANS?

Coffee beans and light.

Light changes everything…

The stored coffee beans affect :

  1. Air
  2. Moisture
  3. Heat
  4. Light

Continue reading DOES DAYLY LIGHT AFFECT FRESHINESS OF COFFEE BEANS?

0
DSCF7279

ON COFFEE FARM – COFFEE FLOWERS AND COFFEE CHERRIES

Coffee farm

Smart coffee-farmers are also passionate bee-keeper! That way, they are making sure that plenty bees and butterflies are dancing around their coffee-gardens.

Fruitful work enables them to harvest excellent coffee beans. After all, they can also collect and enjoy delicious honey! Continue reading ON COFFEE FARM – COFFEE FLOWERS AND COFFEE CHERRIES

0
DSCF1937

GREEN COFFEE CLASSIFICATION

Overview

The evaluation and grading of green coffee beans is an important step in ensuring an excellent final cup of coffee. Only the finest quality coffee beans should be used for the preparation of extraordinary coffee drinks. Excellent roasting and brewing practices combined with poor-quality coffee beans will not create memorable coffee experiences. Continue reading GREEN COFFEE CLASSIFICATION

0
baristas in work, laviet

COFFEE CULTURE IN ASIA

Coffee travel around South – East  Asia

When I was travelling around Asia, I spoke with many local baristas. I also used the chance to participate in various coffee brewing workshops.

I am amazed, how baristas in Asia generally have a strong desire to really understand the complex processes of coffee growing, harvesting, processing, roasting, brewing and tasting. They want to know, how one process has a causal effect on the other processes. Many Asian baristas enjoy tasting coffee knowledgeably. It brings them happiness to understand why for some brews the most notable flavor is blueberry or dark chocolate. Continue reading COFFEE CULTURE IN ASIA

0
31959351 1884882461535598 9164195114162061312 n

OUTDOOR COFFEE MOMENTS

“Our senses are like a gateway into the world,” says Whitman.
And as we open that gateway through developing our sensory awareness, the world blossoms into a symphony of colors, scents, tastes, sounds, and touch.” – Kenton Whitman, naturalist, writer & educator 

Continue reading OUTDOOR COFFEE MOMENTS

0

Website is Protected by WordPress Protection from eDarpan.com.